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Wednesday, April 29, 2009

Tour of Dubai


Hosted by my helicopter pilot, er... Michael

Of Wars & Wits & Power

Driven by the recent crisis of certain countries who got very uptight over issues of being asked to disarm their missile test launched, their alarming action to remain hostile and persistent in their belief had stirred me to create this part of a furniture combination to depict their behavioral trait, a bookshelf with their golden army, strategically placed underneath, to uphold and to protect their ultimate plans,frozen in time for all to see.
Daniel Loves Objects

Tuesday, April 28, 2009

YTL Residence, Kuala Lumpur

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Paris-based Agence Jouin Manku took on its first large-scale integrated architectural and interior design commission in 2003, when YTL Design Group from Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, invited it to design the residence of a Malaysian power family.

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Completed in the latter part of 2008, the residence is the ultimate expression of the taste, influence and industrial-scale capabilities of the prominent family whose entrepreneurial activities have shaped Kuala Lumpur’s skyline.

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Three generations of the family inhabit the 3,000 square-meter residence designed to accommodate both private and public functions.

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The building includes nine bedrooms, two family rooms, a family kitchen and a private dining area, a family library, a game room, a study, a public reception area, a formal dining room, a ballroom, chapel, 21 bathrooms, a swimming pool, two guest suites plus indoor private and guest parking.

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The initial sketches exploring the owners’ usage requirements reveal resemblances to the boring stacked-boxes look still so ubiquitous in residential architecture. And while traces of the “heaped trailers” syndrome remain in the finished building, this is not the Jetsons, neither are we looking at EPCOT, Tomorrowland or the 1964 New York World's Fair.

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We are in the lush vegetation of a posh Kuala Lumpur residential area, and in spite of the boxiness of the structure, an elegant circular softness manages to permeate the sightlines and key details of the building, making it an agreeable part of its landscape.

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Inside, prominent examples of this curvilinear elegance include the amazing staircases resembling the inside of a shell when viewed from above, and the round ballroom chandelier of 13,000 custom-designed undulating petals of unglazed cast porcelain biscuit.

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The curved walls both inside and out have a functional purpose of providing privacy and enclosing each function gently in its own space. The overall sweeping feel inside the spaces invites the viewer in and creates soft, arching vistas.

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The concept consists of three layers: the base for public functions, the ring for guests and the private house for the family.

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The inside of the magnificent residence is gorgeous with its high ceilings, large windows and abundance of light. White color and natural wood are dominant elements but they allow the view from the vast, mostly retractable, windows to remain the main visual attraction.

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The residence is also a wonderful study of contrasts between inside and outside, private and public, traditional and ultra modern, man-made and natural.

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YTL Design Group of Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, was the architect of record. The Agence Jouin Manku design team included Patrick Jouin, Sanjit Manku, Yann Brossier (architect), Richard Perron (designer). Officina del Paesaggio from Lugano, Switzerland was in charge of the landscape design, and L’Observatoire, New York, USA handled the lighting. - Tuija Seipell

Casa no Gerês

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Casa no Gerês, designed by Porto-based Correia/Ragazzi Aquitectos, has received its fair share of international awards and exposure, but we cannot help but show it off one more time. This is the first project by Graça Correia and her new Italian partner, Roberto Ragazzi. It is a bold statement that hides nothing.

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This is also a house that is easy to love from certain perspectives and from others; it looks quite unsuitable for its surroundings. From some angles, the house seems like an accident, some kind of a mishap with transportation containers and building materials. One part of the building is buried inside the hill while another sticks out over the river. It appears about to teeter off the hill at any moment, just waiting to land in its final resting place in the river.

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The owners, Micé and Eduardo Pinto Ferreira, have been Correia’s clients for more than a decade, and gave her carte blanche to create their dream house on the 5,000 square-meter site by the Cávado river — as long as no trees were cut and the 60 square-meter house (maximum allowed footprint for the site) was made of concrete. The house is located in Peneda-Gerês National Park, along the Spanish border in northern Portugal, so the environment and its inviolability were crucial and the rules strict.

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But looking out from the inside, the awesome beauty of the home becomes apparent. The simplicity of the structure, the openness of the views and the calm balance of the elements seems to speak the same language as the bleak surroundings. Nature has a way of being beautiful even when it is not, and this house knows that secret.

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The warmth and proper scale of the building become even clearer when the illuminated house is viewed at night. It may look like it landed from some other planet, but it appears to be right at home now. - Tuija Seipell

Trojan House - Melbourne


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From the street, this Edwardian house might seem unassuming, undeserving of a second glance. From the back, however, the addition to the Trojan House by Jackson Clements Burrows, where three children’s bedrooms are cantilevered above a large living space, is anything but ordinary.

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The entire addition is wrapped in a seamless timber skin that conceals any obvious openings. Windows, covered by shutters that follow the pattern of the façade, reveal nothing of the interior space.  

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Incidentally the inside is just as remarkable as the outside. A thermal chimney and a breezeway corridor allow for passive cooling in the warmer months as each room was designed to allow for cross ventilation.  Additionally a rain screen provides extra shade from the hot summer sun, and also insulates the inside in the winter by forming a space for warm air. - Andrew J Wiener

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Panama House, Sao Paulo, Brazil


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Marcio Kogan’s Panama House is a residence designed for art. Located in São Paulo, Brazil, the house makes a powerful but subdued statement in its low, open, elongated elegance — a hallmark of Kogan’s architecture.

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In the past few years, the award-winning, Brazilian-born architect’s Studio MK27 has produced a steady stream of low-rise, boxy work – all with an uncanny intimacy, yet without any of the usual stuffy treatments that supposedly create intimacy.

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At the Panama House, there are no cozy nooks, no soft furnishings, no homey touches. And yet, there is a feeling of comfort and livability in this art-gallery-of-a-house that makes you want to move in tomorrow.

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All levels of the three-storey house — including the bedrooms, office, gardens and patio — are used to display the owner’s substantial collection of predominantly modern Brazilian art and sculpture.

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An uninterrupted connection between inside and out makes the entire space seem unlimited, translucent, as if without walls, although the structure is essentially a wooden box inside a C-shaped concrete cask made of cement slabs and a wall.

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The sliding vertical wood lathes that form the brise soleils for each room’s facade, are also an important part of establishing the prevailing openness. The brise soleils also provide comfort and privacy, and enable the control of the artworks’ exposure to direct sun.

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Most beautifully, they also create the soft play of light that matches the overall linear shapes — created by creases in window treatments, the floor boards, the rows of pillows on long sofas, the stone work outside — continuing the elongated language of the entire building.

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The São Paulo-born architect Marcio Kogan graduated from Mackenzie University in 1976 and created films until the age of 30. His considerable talents of creating drama, understanding a setting and leading the eye are certainly evident in the award-winning Panama House. - Tuija Seipell

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Cool Tree Houses

Amazon Tree Houses was formed in 2007 by Derek Saunderson, a Joiner and Treehouse builder with over twenty years experience. His aim was to bring the craft of treehouse building back from the accountants and sales-men, and put it firmly back in the hands of the crafts-men who's passion for treehouse building shows in their skill and commitment for creating beautiful natural structures.















Baroque Bookshelves

Avant-garde baroque style metal bookshelves
Graham and Green

Friday, April 24, 2009

Kaos

Some people sort their books alphabetically by title or author, others according to the theme or style, while still others base the organization on color or size. There is no ideal system as organizing based on the one perspective always causes chaos in terms of the other. kaos makes productive use of this disorder: books are stored in little groups, which makes it possible for various organizing systems to exist alongside one another. The result is a three-dimensional picture composed of books – unpredictable and, by principle, chaotic.

Variously shaped shelves are mounted onto a base board. The arrangement as 90 degree angles renders the structure stable and able to withstand heavy loads. kaos should ideally be mounted on the wall.
destilat

Thursday, April 23, 2009

Bookshelf annotation

书架-注解
人类语言的诞生基于人与人之间交流的同意,由于事物的变化发展,以及人自身的差别,语言变得更加复杂化,"解释"并成了语言沟通的一个内容.然而解释是建立在智慧与知识在加个人的表达能力的基础之上的,智慧和知识来源于人类从诞生发展到至今的探索和知识的积累经验,以及个人的前瞻预见能力;以及这种能力所解释的未来的发展变化.而不管是过去现在和将来的这些,都被智慧知识的载体-书籍记录下来,并且传于后世.
LAUdesign

Wednesday, April 22, 2009

The Old Courtyard Hotel

On our recent vacation to Fort Kochi, Kerala, we stayed at an old Portuguese heritage hotel called The Old Courtyard Hotel on Princess Street.
As we entered the huge wooden door, we were immediately transported to the elegance and beauty of a by-gone era.
This restored heritage building now offers 8 rooms, that overlook a charming courtyard.
You can enjoy a cup of cardamom tea sitting under a huge mango tree in the center of the courtyard, or dig into their wide variety of desserts that are so very popular!
The white-washed walls, the arches, antique furniture, the old switchboards and the attention to details makes this quaint place very special.The dining area faces the courtyard. We were torn between enjoying the view and devouring their delicious breakfast:-)
View from the first floor balcony.
The terracotta tiled roof and the fresh green leaves of the mango tree make a lovely combination.
Top view of the Old Courtyard Hotel
Magical light filtering in through the window as we were shown our room.The patina of the seasoned wooden floor with my cup of tea:-)
The owners have retained the original floor and I am so glad they did, the feel of the smooth wood against the feet is something else.The rain-gods decided to shower their blessings on us that evening and the Old Courtyard took on a magical feel.We just stood there watching the rain beat down while sipping our Masala Chai this time;-)
If we traveled to Fort Cochin again, we would surely return to this charming 17th century abode.
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